Monitoring MOFs

Ever wanted to monitor your MOF synthesis on the cheap? Look no further, because Felicity’s Open Access paper describing how MOF scale-up can be improved using an open source, multi-channel monitor – all built for less than $100 – is now out in Scientific Reports! She used simultaneous temperature, turbidity, pH, and visible light absorbance to track the formation of STA-16(Ni), observing the reaction critical processes that guided the development of a faster and more efficient synthesis route to material with comparable porosity.

The work was performed while Felicity was a Part II student in Oxford during her project at Johnson Matthey, co-supervised by Tim Johnson, Stephen Poulson and Stephen Bennett.

New year, new arrivals

This month we are joined by Harry Lloyd and Aaron Chambers, who will be starting two exciting, collaborative PhD projects in the group!

Harry is studying time-resolved dynamics of framework materials under electric fields on a joint Diamond Light Source PhD studentship. He’ll be co-supervised by Dr Lucy Saunders and Dr Mark Warren from Diamond, where he’ll spend two years getting hands-on at Beamline I19-1!

Aaron is studying the formation and processing of MOF nanoparticle composites as part of a collaboration initiative between the University of Birmingham and BAM, the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin. He’ll be co-supervised by Dr Brian Pauw from BAM, where he’ll visit to perform 3-D printing and in-depth structural characterisation.